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to the world economy. >> at the summit the g8 leaders issued a cautious assessment of the global economy. in a statement, the g8 warned that, quote, global economic prospects remain weak. though downside risks have reduced thanks in part to significant policy actions taken, unquote. in the u.s., the euro zone and japan. they depicted 2014 as a quote unquote difficult one with the euro zone in recession and the american economy still hampered by high unemployment. china did not participate in the discussions since china is not a member of the g8 although japan, its neighbor, is. >> why are the economies around the world slowing down. >> because the economies around the world have accumulated too much debt and they don't know how to get the economies moving again. china's growth rate is down to 6 or 5%. no one knows where it's going. exports within the european community are dropping all over the place. virtually every european country -- look at the unemployment rate in spain. it's 26%. you look at italy, france and spain, they're all cass -- basket cases. they have a debt to retail. just
? or is this a chance to take advantage of lower asset prices just as the economy shifts into a higher gear? >> one point we think a lot of investors are missing, though, is that the fiscal drag to the economic growth scenario for the u.s. next year becomes far more favorable. >> let's get prospective from phil orlando. phil, as always, good to see you. question number one, is this bull market interrupted or bull market fatally wounded. >> we're just interrupted, tyler. there is no question the sell off was a reaction but the market is missing it. the federal reserve in our view is going to be making a data dependent decision. for them to pull it that's been aggressive for a number of years, they have to believe the economy is ready to grow at 3% or better and they wouldn't pull the accommodation if they felt the economy was weak. so that's a positive, not a negative. >> basically, it seems to me, phil, that what chairman bernanke said yesterday is what he's been saying for months. he did put more sharp points on it but what occurs to me is that the sentiment in the market has changed. a month ago
support is necessary. if the economy does not improve along the lines that we expect, we'll provide additional support. if financial conditions evolve in a way that's inconsistent with economic recovery, we will provide support. but we're -- and in that way, we hope to increase confidence both among market participants, but also among investors and private consumers and other people in the economy. but again, your point is well taken that we are in a position where the simple adjustment by 25 basis points in the federal funds rate seems like a long-ago experience. and we are in a more complex type of situation. but we are determined to be as clear as we can, and we hope that you and your listeners and the markets will all be able to follow what we're saying. >> we'll go to donna and then go to peter. >> donna boreack with american banker. next month will be the anniversary of the dodd-franken act. can you provide us an update on where we stand with the rule makings and, also, are you still optimistic we will see the rules completed by the end of this year? >> it's certainly true tha
of an ingracious way to do it because ben bernanke got him elected by pumping all the money into the economy, and being the only thing promoting economic growth because his fiscal policies he even admits fail. that's pretty bad. i was shocked at bernanke's statements yesterday. they were clear and concise and said in clear terms that we're going to end this, when we get any sort of indication it's probably going to be over. we may even end et al. together next year if the economy starts to improve. he knows the markets are so volatile, on tender hooks about ending quantitative easing, and you have to thicket was payback. >> neil: normally, they stay before you fire a person, make sure you have their security pass. and check they don't have weapons. but in this case, the powerful weapon. i'm not saying -- there could be the temptation to say i'm going do it sooner than the market thinks. >> i don't think what the president said was an accident. i don't think he says anything accidentally. and you can read a lot into that. and there has been a ton of chatter since that interview, talking abou
of the monetary stimulus out of the equation if the economy is getting better. and he says, the economy is showing signs of getting better and we think by year end and into 2014, it's going to be better still. so we anticipate being able to take away some of the scaffolding around this building and let it see whether it can stand on its own two feet. why is that bad news? why are commodities, stocks and bonds selling off on what, really, you could interpret as good news? >> i think it really isn't bad news, and i do think that much of what chairman bernanke said yesterday was in line with market expectations, but it clearly wasn't in line with investor positioning. so people are selling because they had a different expectation of where the fed was going to be. we now have a situation where there is some concern coming out of the markets, are the feds going to move too soon? i think that's unlikely. inflation continues to fall, so we're in a disinflationary environment. i think the feds' investments on employment are probably accurate, so i think as we look at the second half of the year, positions
point. the economy is soft, inflation virtually non-existent and i'm just going to add why risk deflation when we barely have a recovery at all? one major consequence of the bernanke policy of ending bond purchases is the big jump in interest rates and that, in turn, changes stock market valuations and that is one big reason for the large correction in stocks this week. no one can foretell the future. least of all, me. but let me just ask a couple of questions here. have treasury rates completely discounted an end to qe, okay? i don't think they have. here's my fear. i'm just going to say this. if you play this out, the ten-year treasury ought to be the same as the growth of total spending or nominal gdp in the economy and that's 3.5%, maybe 4%. we're at 2.5% on the treasury. in other words, in the last year we'll be looking at rates going to 4% in treasurys and i don't think that's in the market yet. now, also, will both stocks and bonds play cat and mouse with the fed? every day, every week, every month for the next couple of months. that's going to be a tough one. since i don
the fedotenko start scaling back its bond buying program at the end of the year if the economy continues to improve. his comments at the meeting shook the stock and bond market. it's greater optimism. the unemployment could drop to 6 point phone 5% in 2014. that's a year earlier than previously thought. they're still not concerned about inflation and think gdp might expand faster than 3% over the next two years. bernanke tried to draw a distinct line between tapering and the end of qe 2. >> the most important thing that i just want to convey again is that it's important not to say this date, that date, this time. it's important to understand our policies are economic dependent. >>> so coming from the fed. equities sold off in the united states. you can see here just about 35, 40 stocks on the dow jones 500. ftse up 1 2/3. the pmi number. basic resources are the biggest seller. that comes off with china, hsbc pmi down at a nine-month low. new orders down. we're getting more on that from munich. the market reaction, this means commodities are weaker as well to date. spot gold down 3% this
the downside risks to the economies have diminished. that's certainly good news. the economy is improving. then they went on to say, mr. bernanke reiterated, the fed may taper bond purchases at the end of the year and finish by mid-2014. that was a little more flesh on the bones of their plan there. that was the important part of that. stocks and bonds dropped on that. the dow jones industrials average. we have ended at the lows of the day, down about 200 points in the dow. that started dropping -- even though we were down before 2:00, the slide accelerated as mr. bernanke began speaking at 2:30 on the press conference. bonds took it on the chin. take a look at the agg. this is the bond etf, the largest one that's out there. that's an aggregate of the total bond market. this is now essentially sitting at a two-year low. let's move on. low inflation, not great necessarily. for gold. gold took it on the chin as well. take a look at gold. gold is also closing right near two-year lows. these are intraday charts. but gold is near a two-year low right now. other commodities dropped as well toda
/3 of the economy. the treasury department said that the shortfall was more than 25%. it's part of the reason that stoo standard & poors raised the rating of the u.s. to stable. the product line of the mobile operating system at the annual developer's conference, the software will be developed this fall, and has easier sharing of photos. it's a nervous week for the markets for sure. worries about the federal reserve and other concerns, do you stand pat or make changes in your portfolio. good to see you both here. thank you for joining us. let's talk about this week, rebecca, it felt like there was a change in feeling this week, we know the fed will stop at some point, but really, really volatile markets. up 200, down 200 and then a big bounce back on thursday. were you surprised at the volatility this week? >> a little bit, yeah. we all knew this day would come, but we never knew what it would feel like, because we have never lived through anything like this before. the easing and the monetary policy in u.s., across europe and japan is something that there's no precedent for. we knew there wo
contributes to gdp and makes up more than two-thirds of the u.s. economy. america is on track with the smallest deficit for five years. the -- a fall of more than 25%. a reason standard and poor's raised the credit rating from negative to stable. a the software will he easier photo sharing and it's siri voice activation software. >> the dow losing streak, bond yields rising, worries about the federal reserve. what to do, stand pat? joining me right now, the chief investment officer, and jason, chief investment officer. thank you so much. so, rebecca, not like their there was change in sentiment this week. now we know the fed is going to stop at some point, but really, really volatile markets. up 200, down 200, then a big bounceback on thursday. were you surprised? >> a little bit. we all knew the day would come butl the quantitative easing, the monetary policy in the u.s. and europe and japan, something there's no precedent for. so we knew there would be some sort of market reaction when the tone started to change, but this is bigger than most people expected. >> what does the
? this global economy. certainly, ups is a definite no whether to where we are headed. right now, checking out stocks. nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole: the dow jones industrials down about 28 points. not to off the unchanged line. there is this wait and see mode today. the last trading days have been up more than 100 trading points. the volatility is back. it has been the name of the game since may 22. we heard that tapering maybe in the future. right now everyone is just waiting to see what the fed really has to say. the language is so key here. everyone is waiting to see. right now you can see that the dow is down just slightly. lori: you summed it up beautifully for us. we will get one of the most federal reserve statements ever and less than an hour. will we get any clue as to when tapering will begin? thank you so much for joining us. what are you expecting to hear from the fed today? >> i expect no change. the statement is key. i will look for the labor market. is this the best that we are going to get? if, yes, i expect the taper to put off. lori: o
. the difference this time around, the economy is better, housing is better, the labor market is better. this time around, i think it is a little different, a little bit better fundamental backdrop. tracy: let's talk about how we can position our bonds for it. >> it is hard to know exactly where this will settle out. the move of two to 40 has been pretty dramatic. we may have already covered a lot of the ground we will cover. on the equity side, i think you have to be overweighted in the u.s. still. i like the domestics of the goals. we are the only major market in the world that is growing and i think stocks here are still reasonably priced. tracy: i know you also like tech. >> the problem with tech is you have to be a little discriminating because as a factor, it derives more of its product overseas than ever. the tech sector, in my view, again, is pretty reasonably valued. tracy: we have to talk about commodities. gold is down. event gold typically down this time of year? >> i would not be getting into gold. i think gold is being washed out as a result of the fed's projections. the rest of the
effect. >> i want to get your take tot economy broad lly speaking, lisn to the former ceo of ge. >> things are not bad, things are not bad. this is a 2% he economy. it's not a disaster. it's a 2% economy and we will not create enough jobs with this level of economy to get out of the 7s. >> so 2% economy. do you think the market is ahead of itself knowing we are in a 2% grower? >> personally, i don't think so, the phrase we have been using is tina, there's no alternative. and i agree with rebecca, that you are not in a situation where you are going to be getting high real rates from bonds. i think the back up in bond yields was a reminder that you can lose money, particularly in bond funds. so it's a very strong environment. i think, it's a strong reminder that equities are an important part of the total return that investors are seeking. >> and i think one of the good things that he said about unemployment rate and it not coming down quickly. you know, consumers doing well, businesses are still cautious and we are in a global economy and a lot of u.s. companies today, depend on
today, and roughly 2% under performing economy, there's just no reason for interest rates to jump higher. the u.s., by the way, is really the only global stock market game in town. our companies are profitable. so at these levels it may not be roaring bullish. i don't think the fed is going to taper down tomorrow, and i do believe the bull market is far from over. that's my take. let's welcome kenneth heed ner. and i'm joined by george gilder. he has the book "knowledge is power." ken, what say you? >> i say that we have a number of years of growth ahead of us in the economy. it's growing at 2%. it's going to accelerate as consumer confidence rises with rising housing prices. we'll see 3, 4, 5% growth rate. >> 3, 4, 5%, those are big numbers. you had an okay housing number today but housing starts are up 29% on year. here's my inflation point. the year-to-year cpi, 1.4%. guys like me two years ago worry about inflation, money printing, i was wrong. i said that before. the best set indicator, 1.0%. without inflation, why should inflation rates have to go higher? >> they go a little bit hi
what he said? valuations are attractive still. businesses are doing well. the economy is strengthening. get this. he says even with $20 billion, he opportunity have enough money to take advantage of all the opportunities here. >> 20. it's not all his. >> he says he's not looking at this point like, look, maybe the rate of the market has slowed down. we're not talking about three year doubles at this point. he says for his funds he's looking more five or six years for doubling. maybe nine or ten for the market. still talking about a very strong market and a place he sees great opportunity. >> these are times you try to keep your cool. >> got to have some powder. got to have dry powder. >> i wish we had all the guys looking for -- if they were to come on and say no, no, no, i'd feel better. they're never able to pull the trigger. want to go overseas? >> i think we should. for a moment. >> take us there. >> i hear this whole thing in china is kind of just not just ben bernanke creating some problems. let's talk about trading in asia and europe today. ross westgate standing by in london. f
this year. if they remain broadly aligned with our current expectations for the economy, we will continue to reduce the pace of purchases in measured steps through the first half of next year ending purchases around mid year. >> the bonds finished in the red as the blue chip index showed its seventh straight move. all the main s&p sectors closed lowers. the worst performers were defensive sectors. telecons. this is what people had been warning us, look out for those stocks that act more like bonds. that's exactly what happened yesterday. the yield on the ten year treasury, it hit a 15-month high if you take a look at that. 2.426%. this is a concerning move. this morning the dow futures are indicated down triple digits once again. this is on top of a 200 point plus drop yesterday. it doesn't look like there's going to be a quick bounce back, at least not this morning. >> we have a number of newsmakers to help us make our way through all of this, get through these questions raised by the fed bank. including alfred broaddus and former minneapolis fed. we have john stumpf. cisco is going to h
consequential meeting for markets and the federal reserve in terms of guiding markets and guiding the economy on policy here. i want to give you some tips that i think is a way to listen to bernanke today. i think you want to watch the forecast, the 2.6% gdp growth, the average for 2013 and the 7.4% unemployment rate. those could both come down here. unemployment could actually go either way, but i think it might come down here. watch the tapering guidance of the the market bet is that there is not a taper at this meeting, but bernanke could lay the groundwork for september or sooner. rates versus qe. listen to the chairman try to talk. we expect this, that he'll start to say, you know what, bernanke could strive to convince the markets that tapering does not mean a rate hike, and finally i would expect the third degree on the third term. expect many questions on whether bernanke wants to stay or if, you know, he's been fired. one thing i want to show you is the ten-year. we'll be asking the fed chairman about traits and whether the rise in rates is something that the fed wants to have happen
an immigration system in our country that meets the needs of a growing economy, the biggest economy in the world that focuses on making our country stronger, not weaker, and hopefully will put this debate behind us. so i yield the floor. >> yield for a question. first could i say all of us who have had the honor of working with you and the senator from north dakota greatly appreciate the work that you've done. if there is going to be a broad bipartisan support for the final product it will be because of what you and the senator from north dakota have done. and i'm very, very grateful for that. and i think that it is important wouldn't you agree that people understand that this is a very tough bill. and it required a lot of cooperation from our friends on the other side of the aisle to go along and agree with this. i think that they've shown a great deal of compromise in order to reach this point and agree with us on this legislation, which clearly we need bipartisan support for. but i would like to ask the senator again for a couple of specifics. because i think it is important we understand how
mean for commerce and economy. >>> and now a backing off of a bid for sprint by dish, and they will concentrate on clearwire. >>> and also, a look at icahn stepping up dell bid. >>> and now the fed is wrapping up the two-day policy meeting this afternoon. investors hoping that fed will provide clarity about how and when the fed will wind down the bond buying program. make sure to watch the statement, and ben bernanke's news conference which is i perhaps more important, and it starts at 2:00 p.m., and one way or another, it is going to be nice to get something out of the way, wouldn't it? >> yes, i used to regard these events as big bad events when i worked at the hedge fund, because there could be relief even if he says the wrong thing and i'd love for him to address the 10-year, because it signals that the e kconomy is better, b it is not just weak. but if you address the 10-year, i'm in control and the bond vigilantes are not. i believe when this is over, we will come back and discuss -- i'm not kidding -- stocks. >> although, is it possible that the language that h
is not only allowing inflation, but the fact that it won't come down. and now the u.s. economy has to take into account that and the move of rates and the 1.5% move in rates is a hard pill to follow. >> and scott n the last three or maybe four, the feds have come in, and they have said, i am short the 10-year and take a boatload and every year they are wrong, and perhaps now, but to this point, we are waiting for an appreciable move in rates for year and years and the fact that the economy may not stand on its own legs is curious to me. i am curious what you are hearing out there, as well, scott, in terms of the pain people are taking on the fixed income side, and those who are not short credit and obviously watching the equities sell off. >> the market, whether it is treasuries or equities, the market was probably hoping and probably against the better judgment probably that bernanke yesterday was going to sort of walk it back, and walk back the notion that they were going to mention taper org that -- tapering or going to do it any time soon and we know that the people you are talking abo
-- pumping billions and billions of dollars into the economy. is it possible that we have gone from a tech bubble to a housing bubble to a fed bubble? >> it's absolutely a risk. the real question is is this easing? all this billions and billions of dollars, trillions of dollars really of dollars the federal reserve has printed and pumped into the economy. have they created a real enduring economic expansion? can housing exist? can housing keep recovering even without ultra-cheap money? can the housing market keep rising without ultra-cheap money? can housing growth continue? that's the bet that ben bernanke has been making the past couple of years. the question is is the debt going to pay off, or will we be right back in this mess we were five years ago? >> isn't the case when former chairman allen greenspan greens retired, he was pummeled because of the housing bubble. isn't it the case, since greenspan left, we've become more liberal with our monetary supply as far as pumping more money into the monetary supply. money has been basically free for investors and businesses for the past seve
morning to you. leaders of the world's most powerful economies are gathering in northern ireland for a two-day summit. british prime minister david cameron is the host, and he's pushing for countries to share more financial information. leaders there also expected to discuss differences on some of the big issues. syria's civil war, free trade between europe and north america and of course global tax evasion. we'll have a live report from steve sedgwick on the ground in the next hour. >>> unions in turkey, they're on a owuone-day strike over the eviction of protesters from a park in istanbul. police and protesters clashed from sporadically overnight following a weekend of scuffles in the city. nbc's richard engel will join us with the latest in the next hour. >>> also in corporate news this morning, a large activist investor in smithfield foods is pressuring the company to explore a break-up rather than go ahead with that planned $4.7 billion takeover by a chinese meat producer. i don't know if this is going to make joe happy or not, but "the wall street journal" reporting that starboard va
about how the economy is still a bit dicey and jobs aren't being created fast enough. now they're thinking he just wants to put everybody to work, he's not worried about the bonds. bondholders are saying to heck with this, you're not going to protect us, economy is way too strong for bernanke to keep buying bonds, he can't keep rates down, he shouldn't even try. the owners of bonds aren't as worried about the ongoing drag of the federal government that bernanke's fretting about and talked about today. they aren't worried about higher taxes, sequester spending cuts or any lack of any serious attempt by elected officials to get hiring going. they are selling their bonds right now before things get so much better that those bonds will be worth even less! to understand how bonds work i've got to do something different because i know a lot of people can't tell the difference between a stock and a bond. so i'm going to -- i'm going to do a little fictional analysis here. imagine that the united states is a publicly traded company. and it's got this really counterintuitive stock that
university, about the state of the u.s. economy. later in the program we will be joined by a matthew segal. he will be here to talk about issues important to young americans. you are watching "washington journal." we will be right back. ♪ >> when you talk about transparency to the american public, there is -- you are going to give up something. you are going to be giving signals to our adversaries as to what our capabilities are. the more specific you get about the program, the more specific about the oversight, the more specific you get about the capabilities and successes, to that extent you have people sitting around saying, "ok, now i understand what it can be done with our numbers in yemen and in the united states and consequently i am going to find another way to communicate." there is a price to be paid for that transparency. where that line is drawn, in terms of identifying what our capabilities are, is out of our hands. if you tell us to do it one way we will do it that way. there is a price to be paid for transparency. >> robert muller makes his last scheduled appearance before
the eurozone economy, arguing that recent signs of market stabilization mean that the ecb's interest rates are becoming a more effective tool again. we'll see about that. >>> also, g-8 leaders are wrapping up a summit in northern ireland today. british prime minister david cameron has, of course, been the host. he says the goal of the group is to "fired up our economies and drive growth and prosperity around the world." we're going to have more, of course, from cnbc's steve sedgwick, who's on the ground there in that beautiful live shot in about 20 minutes. >>> meantime, time for "the global markets report." we'll go across the pond not to ireland, but to london, where ross westgate is standing by this morning amid a sea of green. a little bit of red around. how are you doing, ross? >> yeah, hey, andrew, pretty good. we're actually at the best levels of the session today here for european equities. advances out-pacing decliners by around about, what, 6-2, 7-2 on the dow jones stocks 600. it's been a mixed morning, but the ftse 100 now up 0.8%, despite the that is correct if inflation numbe
pleasure, thank you. >>> next in the money lead, the head of the fed says the economy is improving but free money is still flowing. so where do we stand now? plus, amnesty, the word that might kill the immigration reform bill. many conservatives coming to washington are fed up. i will ask democratic congressman castro whether he thinks the immigration reform bill has a chance in the house. [ indistinct conversations ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. ♪ hooking up the country whelping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country mo
, given the fact that we are becoming energies efficient with fracking? our economy is growing, the dow is up today 161 points, can we ignore the world events and continue to go on with the kind of relationships we used to need? >> no. i think it is more important that america become a player. we still have so many other issues. as the world is getting smaller, america must exert their influence in ways that were unforeseen 20 or 30 years ago. we have to be engaged. if we take an internal role of we are not needed as we were, i think that we do it at our peril. lori: a lot of economists are very concerned about this currency war that is underway. you have countries at the g8 representing $7 trillion in global economic wealth. do you think that that topic will come up? how do you realistically have a discussion about a trade deal if you do not talk about what is really going on. >> there is no question about it. if we will have a trade agreement, it has to be free, it has to be fair, and it has to be equitable to all parties. if one party has an upper hand, it is honored as a breach. com
the food away, and buy one lobster and get one lobster, and it is bad. darden blames the economy for people not spending at lo of money to buy the breadsticks. i don't want to hear that. >> and meanwhile, we think that the economy is improving and yesterday the numbers in a different environment most likely would have been positives for the equity market, but we are not overwhelmed by the worries of the philly fed, and numbers that most people thought were better than they thought it would be. >> and i look at the bonds and how is the 10-year, strong. okay. buy me 50,000, whatever. we are in one of the moments and if we are not looking at the bonds, you know, having fun. >> and something else that people were looking at is the chinese shibor. we don't talk about it a lot. >> right, something that can jump up to bite you. >> and the rate has come down overnight, and they are trying to tighten up the money supply, and tighten it up, and the corporate inflows are not as strong as they might have originally been for china, but all part of the plan in a way of 300 million people, and 15 years to
'll give the economy before it decides to reduce the monthly asset purchases. to me, the market has kind of adjusted its own expectations both for the worse and better, much more than the fed's message has changed. so i feel like it's really a lot of suspension been drained out of this meeting. by the way, the market itself, the treasury yields have calmed down. >> all right. amy, let me ask you in terms of allocating capital. where are you seeing the flow right now in terms of putting money to work? where is the conviction out there? what sector? >> well, hi, maria. from an options perspective, it's pretty interesting, because i think a lot of folks out there would say the fed's probably not going to say too much tomorrow. it may delay things out later. our own house view is for an october tapering session. however, from the options point of view, you've actually seen short-term term structure come up. so to translate that, that's basically saying near term, more volatility is expected relative to the outer terms. so the options market is actually expecting something for tomorrow, and y
people have looked at the economy and said, wait a minute, we're not nearly to the point where the fed can take its foot off the gas. but if you look at their forecast for not only this year, but even moving forward, they are a little bit ahead of where consensus is and that's key to what they. >> 2.6. i want to see loan growth. you don't have new splurge in housing, obviously, because the people are kind of caught up by the rates. but, yes, the stocks that acted well last week, i used again mills and bristol meyers, imminent recession in 8 to 12 months. they bottomed. you don't want to see that. in other words, this is the fed step as way and people believe that there's nothing there. i'd like to think the fed stays in, until we get more than one month of good loan growth. >> to that point, you are talking about my multiple stocks there. they had something to be taken out of them given what were, what multiples -- >> 18, 20. >> higher than some of the peers in the biotechnology sphere which is hard to believe because they're going at a good rate faster. >> i don't want to get caught i
on the economy but signaled this in no way means rates will go up. that led to a bit of a swoon in stocks during the session yesterday. the dow gave up more than 100 points. robin harding, who wrote the article, then took to twitter to tell everyone to chill out. he later defended his piece on cnbc's "fast money." >> the fed has a one-week blackout during which it doesn't say anything to anybody. so, people need to react to the content of the story rather than the existence of the story. and what i've seen happening today, and i think we saw it happening last week, too, is the market was reacting as if there's some secret bat signal coded here. >> asked if the article was timed for the greatest market impact, harding says he has nothing to do with that, that "the ft" sends out pieces when they write them. i mentioned mr. draghi as well. he says the ecb is looking at negative to positive rates with an open mind and with all intended consequences, rates becoming more effective. again, another measure we looked at on the considered possibility of having a break on deposit facilities, speaking in je
about the underlying economy. >> it's the economico outlook. >> you don't think he'll use the word? >> i don't think he'll use the letter. >> people will ask questions. >> but as long as -- as long as it doesn't start with a t. if there is a t in the world somewhere, he may use it. >> we could have a drinking game. first question has to be about tapering. will use the word taper. >> either tape ever or your ter. >> i was at a party with a drinking game, but it was with lemonade. makes no sense. they're practicing for the day when -- legmonade, you'll just get sick. >> that's okay. learn a lesson. >> i know. >> let's take a look at europe. again, futures are indicated higher and that may be because the expectation is that the fed will in fact slightly lower their economic outlook. if that he another case, you would expect they would not be pulling qe anytime soon. but right now the market is barely bunching in europe. in asia, you can see the nikkei was up about 1.8%. so volatility continues there. hang seng down by just over 1%. oil prices right now are indicated up about 50 cents. wti i
pulls the jumper cables off the drained battery that's been the economy, a healthy financial sector could be good, needed, and essential for a sustainable economic recovery. >> you mentioned oracle, nick. a lot of people were looking at oracle and saying this is evidence that global growth is slow. so what did you see in the oracle numbers? >> when we look at the numbers for all of the companies, things that are still tied into the emerging markets -- >> i see. >> -- the emerging economies are still struggling the most. when we collect all of the economic data, it's saying come home to the u.s. and so, some of the defensive sectors, the financials as well, we still like best some of the trends. not utilities, but telecom we like. when it comes to certain technology sectors and materials, energy, industrials, you know, these emerging economies, there's some scary things going on, particularly with the short-end rates in china. >> and the outflows prove it. >> yeah, rick santelli, how much higher on the 10-year yield, do you think in. >> i wish i could tell you. if this was a normal m
. >> and if we can be freed from some of the regulatory burdens, this economy could take off, and so will the stock market. >> thank you, sir. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good morning and welcome the "squawk on the street." i'm david faber with jim cramer and scott right here. carl quintanilla is off this morning, and afterf a 100-point rally, the fed is under the microscope as it begins, you know it, a two-day meeting. the futures are holding onto the gains and consumer prices up one point in may, and housing starts rose above street forecast, but we are looking for a higher open. >> yes. >> and a actually more defensive. looking at europe, a mixed picture, and you can see it on the continent there, but a lot of green on the map. start with our own road map starting with day one of the fed meeting as the market swings over almost any mention on the word of the word taper. president obama hints that ben bernanke could be on his way out. scott? >> and david, here is sony activist dan loeb asking for a second time to spin off the entertainment arm. th
/11 to the american economy? trillions of dollars. think about the lies that have been saved. they will only tell us about a couple of those. they have to be careful about sources and methods. still needs oversight. congress should be looking at it closely. i am pretty comfortable with what they have laid out so far. connell: speaking of september 11 and attacks on our financial industry, general alexander have the following quote talking about rather being here debating this point in trying to explain how we failed to prevent another 9/11. do you think that these programs , you know, the internet surveillance or the phone collection, in terms of records, do you think that that would have prevented september 11? >> they did say something to this effect. he said they may have been able to track one of the 9/11 hijackers if they had this program before 9/11. that is if i heard it correctly. that tells you something. who knows where we would be today in our history if they would have been able to do that. connell: supporters of the nsa leaker say he has been able to prompt or develop this discussion th
the economy offset these gains in some of the financial sectors. shrugging off weakness in the mainland, property place outperformed hong kong helping the hang seng gain 1.2% today. the sector rebounded for the second session after very sharp selloffs recently. so we may be seeing some bargain hunting here. and elsewhere in australia, banking shares helped at the sx 200 reversed earlier losses ending higher by 0.7%. but under pressure, down 0.3%. and some of the southeast asian markets also trading in the green at the moment. back to you, ross. >> all right, catch you later. joining me in the studio, co-ceo of wells fargo financial services. american stocks down three out of the last four, this after good gains this year. is sentiment going to be shifting around now over the next few months as we question the fed and japan? >> undoubtedly we'll continue to see a lot of volatility. just look at this morning. we have the nikkei up 2.75%. today we have the futures up in the u.s. about 1% and within europe, about 0.75%. and i think we'll continue to see that. the question about japan is, do
weakness, and that's a weakness that will remind us that the actual economy doesn't support much higher interest rates like we had overnight, even though, ultimately, i know they will go higher. see, but this is what's been so unreal about this whole run-up in rates that's caused the stock market to get hit -- it hasn't been justified by the data. and i think monday, we will find it still isn't. thank heavens for bernanke, because if he had listened to the endless chattering hawks in the fed, i know we'd get a hideous number. all the numbers would be hideous. it's just always worth reminding, worth reminding everyone that bernanke's done amazing work, even as all i ever hear is that he's over his head or this must end badly. have you looked around at the world's other economies? we're doing better than everyone else on the globe, in part because our chief executive officers have done an excellent job in a global slowdown, but also because of exactly what bernanke's doing. this bond program has probably allowed you and other americans refi their home and companies fix their balance sheet
to show weakness, and that's a weakness that will remind us that the actual economy doesn't support much higher interest rates like we had overnight, even though, ultimately, i know they will go higher. see, but this is what's been so unreal about this whole run-up in rates that's caused the stock market to get hit -- it hasn't been justified by the data. and i think monday, we will find it still isn't. thank heavens for bernanke, because if he had listened to the endless chattering hawks in the fed, i know we'd get a hideous number. all the numbers would be hideous. it's just always worth reminding, worth reminding everyone that bernanke's done amazing work, even as all i ever hear is that he's over his head or this must end badly. have you looked around at the world's other economies? we're doing better than everyone else on the globe, in part because our chief executive officers have done an excellent job in a global slowdown, but also because of exactly what bernanke's doing. this bond program has probably allowed you and other americans refi their home and companies fix their balanc
, so when does that mess over there start forcing gasoline prices higher and maybe the economy, not just here, but globally lower? sue is at the new york stock exchange. hi, sue. >> hi, ty. food to see you. when a monday on wall street to start out week. the dow has been on the move, smartly higher. right now a triple-digit advance on the dow right now of 166 points. the s&p and nasdaq also in green territory with the s&p up just better than 1%, and the nasdaq is up 1.25%, so actually the nasdaq is faring the west of the three indices 3-m, delphi a hitting all-time highs and boeing, staples, amat hitting 52-week highs. the dow having a triple-digit move, but this is the fifth straight move th session where we've seen that kind of move. a look at the vix and we'll talk about that in just a second. the last week it was up 8%, and that brings us to bob pisani who also tracks the volatility. >> we do, and while it's been up since may 22nd when mr. bernanke gave his congressional testimony, the important thing is steady as she goes. the last few days, real found a floor. look at the
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